Soulful Emotional Punchy Our Interview with Emarosa

Emarosa recently released their fourth album, 131, and it’s the second one with Bradley Walden as the frontman. We talked with Bradley about how has been the journey with the band and what 131 is all about.

Emarosa 2016 Promo (Ashley Osborn)-1

This is the second album you release with Emarosa. The first one was 2014’s album Versus and back then it was a bit stressful for you due the fact you were the new vocalist. How was it like this time around for you?
It was amazing! It was so much fun and there was less stress. I just felt like we really finally connected as musicians and we knew what we wanted to do, so going in and executing it was so simple and it just kind of poured out of us.

By now you got used to perform the band’s older songs and got involved in the new stuff. What was the most challenging thing for you when you joined the band that it’s not a problem anymore?
Having to perform the old songs was kind of annoying because I couldn’t really connect with them emotionally and I’m a very emotional performer and that was rough, but thankfully we don’t actually play those songs anymore and so I don’t have to worry about it. [laughs] We stopped playing songs from Relativity [2008] and the self-titled [2010] probably last year. We decided that those records had their time and it was time to move on, so it’s been great just performing songs that I know I’m emotionally attached to and put my all into.

This is also the first album to feature Matthew Marcellus as a permanent member of the band (guitarist) – he’s been touring with you guys since 2014. Why did you decide now to get him on board?
He has been touring with us for a while. He and ER [White, guitarist] had some guitar parts ideas together and it started to feel normal and right for him to be on the band. It was just time to bring him in and I’m glad he contributed to the record, like the song “Miracle” he was a huge part of that.

In which way do you think you guys evolved your sound during the process of creating this new album?
I don’t know if there’s one specific thing… We just kind of decided to write the record that we wanted to write and we went out on a lime. We brought in a choir, we did some cool vocal programming stuff and just things that the band have never done before. We wanted to think outside of our own box and anything that we thought would be interesting to try or that we wanted to try, we did it! There were no reservations, we literally took the record and made it exactly what we wanted and there was no like “Are people gonna like this?” or “Will this sell?” It was just like “Hey, this would be very fun to do! Let’s do this!” and that was it.

What subjects or references did you dwell on while writing 131?
Personally, I went through a lot of loss and I went through a lot of self-reflection when I started writing, and I think those things are very relatable. Everybody has wondered what they are, what they’re doing. Everybody has stuff that lost and I think in that way it could be a great record to help someone to do something or maybe help someone wake up and realize the air of their ways, you know? Who knows, music does crazy things for a lot of people. For me personally, it’s definitely a lot about loss and self-reflection.

“I went through a lot of loss and I went through a lot of self-reflection when I started writing, and I think those things are very relatable.”

Each song has this huge emotional depth and there’s this one in particular, “Never”, that is really amazing, which has some female vocalist singing with you. What can you tell me more about this song?
That’s actually my fiancée Meeko. She is singing on the song and it’s a song that I kind of wrote for us. It’s an emotional song and I think people can make their own interpretations to the song, but ultimately, it’s like saying “You’re safe. Everything is going to be ok, just accept it.” A lot of people like to create problems that aren’t there out of fear and it’s just saying that you don’t have to do that.

The album ends with the track “Re:” which is an interesting title for a song. What’s the story behind this one?
With this song, we wanted to incorporate every song into it just to kind of end the record with a summary. The title “Re:” can be interpreted like to go back to the beginning. It’s such a cool way to represent the whole record and it ends the way the record starts. Something I really love about it is that it brings the record full circle and it shows it in a much more destroyed nature, which is kind of a reflection of what happens going through all the emotions that are on the record.

You’ve already released two music videos for “Cloud 9” and “Miracle” and both were done by Megan Thompson and they seem to have this connection with the storyline. What can you tell me more about those videos?
Yeah! We filmed the part three already and I’m not sure how much longer it will go, but I would do more. For now there’s this storyline with “Cloud 9” and “Miracle” and the next video, and you can see the character mentally deteriorating and kind of losing his mind.

This new album was produced by Casey Bates (Portugal The Man, Chiodos, Pierce The Veil) and the production is really neat. What did he bring to the Emarosa’s sound?
I think he just did a phenomenal job. He knew what he wanted and we knew what we wanted and it just lined perfectly. He helped shape the songs and ideas that we had in a way that we didn’t see and that’s part of the collaboration and that’s part of the team. That’s why you pick a specific producer because they see something that you may not see and they have a vision. Casey has a lot of tricks, a lot of ideas and a lot of heart. He puts those things into his records and I think that he and I both agree that we made something special with this record.

Why name the album 131?
131 is a number that kind of followed us around… Like I said, there’s a lot of loss and death themes around the record and 131 is my birthday and it’s also the address where we recorded the album. It’s a number that really surrounded the record and the record really named itself, the number just kept following the record around and still to this day I see the number all the time.

Emarosa recently released their fourth album, 131, and it’s the second one with Bradley Walden as the frontman. We talked with Bradley about how has been the journey with the band and what 131 is all about.

This is the second album you release with Emarosa. The first one was 2014’s album Versus and back then it was a bit stressful for you due the fact you were the new vocalist. How was it like this time around for you?
It was amazing! It was so much fun and there was less stress. I just felt like we really finally connected as musicians and we knew what we wanted to do, so going in and executing it was so simple and it just kind of poured out of us.

By now you got used to perform the band’s older songs and got involved in the new stuff. What was the most challenging thing for you when you joined the band that it’s not a problem anymore?
Having to perform the old songs was kind of annoying because I couldn’t really connect with them emotionally and I’m a very emotional performer and that was rough, but thankfully we don’t actually play those songs anymore and so I don’t have to worry about it. [laughs] We stopped playing songs from Relativity [2008] and the self-titled [2010] probably last year. We decided that those records had their time and it was time to move on, so it’s been great just performing songs that I know I’m emotionally attached to and put my all into.

This is also the first album to feature Matthew Marcellus as a permanent member of the band (guitarist) – he’s been touring with you guys since 2014. Why did you decide now to get him on board?
He has been touring with us for a while. He and ER [White, guitarist] had some guitar parts ideas together and it started to feel normal and right for him to be on the band. It was just time to bring him in and I’m glad he contributed to the record, like the song “Miracle” he was a huge part of that.

In which way do you think you guys evolved your sound during the process of creating this new album?
I don’t know if there’s one specific thing… We just kind of decided to write the record that we wanted to write and we went out on a lime. We brought in a choir, we did some cool vocal programming stuff and just things that the band have never done before. We wanted to think outside of our own box and anything that we thought would be interesting to try or that we wanted to try, we did it! There were no reservations, we literally took the record and made it exactly what we wanted and there was no like “Are people gonna like this?” or “Will this sell?” It was just like “Hey, this would be very fun to do! Let’s do this!” and that was it.

What subjects or references did you dwell on while writing 131?
Personally, I went through a lot of loss and I went through a lot of self-reflection when I started writing, and I think those things are very relatable. Everybody has wondered what they are, what they’re doing. Everybody has stuff that lost and I think in that way it could be a great record to help someone to do something or maybe help someone wake up and realize the air of their ways, you know? Who knows, music does crazy things for a lot of people. For me personally, it’s definitely a lot about loss and self-reflection.

“I went through a lot of loss and I went through a lot of self-reflection when I started writing, and I think those things are very relatable.”

Each song has this huge emotional depth and there’s this one in particular, “Never”, that is really amazing, which has some female vocalist singing with you. What can you tell me more about this song?
That’s actually my fiancée Meeko. She is singing on the song and it’s a song that I kind of wrote for us. It’s an emotional song and I think people can make their own interpretations to the song, but ultimately, it’s like saying “You’re safe. Everything is going to be ok, just accept it.” A lot of people like to create problems that aren’t there out of fear and it’s just saying that you don’t have to do that.

The album ends with the track “Re:” which is an interesting title for a song. What’s the story behind this one?
With this song, we wanted to incorporate every song into it just to kind of end the record with a summary. The title “Re:” can be interpreted like to go back to the beginning. It’s such a cool way to represent the whole record and it ends the way the record starts. Something I really love about it is that it brings the record full circle and it shows it in a much more destroyed nature, which is kind of a reflection of what happens going through all the emotions that are on the record.

You’ve already released two music videos for “Cloud 9” and “Miracle” and both were done by Megan Thompson and they seem to have this connection with the storyline. What can you tell me more about those videos?
Yeah! We filmed the part three already and I’m not sure how much longer it will go, but I would do more. For now there’s this storyline with “Cloud 9” and “Miracle” and the next video, and you can see the character mentally deteriorating and kind of losing his mind.

This new album was produced by Casey Bates (Portugal The Man, Chiodos, Pierce The Veil) and the production is really neat. What did he bring to the Emarosa’s sound?
I think he just did a phenomenal job. He knew what he wanted and we knew what we wanted and it just lined perfectly. He helped shape the songs and ideas that we had in a way that we didn’t see and that’s part of the collaboration and that’s part of the team. That’s why you pick a specific producer because they see something that you may not see and they have a vision. Casey has a lot of tricks, a lot of ideas and a lot of heart. He puts those things into his records and I think that he and I both agree that we made something special with this record.

Why name the album 131?
131 is a number that kind of followed us around… Like I said, there’s a lot of loss and death themes around the record and 131 is my birthday and it’s also the address where we recorded the album. It’s a number that really surrounded the record and the record really named itself, the number just kept following the record around and still to this day I see the number all the time.

Source: Music and Riots